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Delphi HMIP Inspection Report - Drake Hall

Posted in: Delphi tribe, Noble Cause, Staff by John Richmond on 6 September 2013
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As a Medical Director I am obviously pleased but also extremely proud of the feedback received following the latest HMIP Report for Drake Hall where Delphi Medical is delivering a range of clinical and nursing services including clinical sessions, dispensing, one to one nursing provision and psychosocial intervention group work.

Particular acknowledgement needs to go to Donna Foxley-Dean, Clinical Manager, for the commitment her team puts into delivering excellent patient care and for her clear and professional leadership. Well done and thank you Donna!

Anyway here's the official report published this week by the HMIP inspectors on Drake Hall.

HP17 The clinical and psychosocial drug service delivery was of a very high quality and supply reduction measures appropriate. A wide range of structured one-to-one and group work interventions was available, including information and recovery-centred approaches to both drugs and alcohol.

Clinical and psychosocial services were integrated well and there were shared care plans and joint reviews and some group work was co-facilitated. The substance use needs analysis was out of date (October 2011) and the drug strategy document (dated March 2012) was in the process of being updated.

Substance misuse

Expected outcomes: Prisoners with drug and/or alcohol problems are identified at reception and receive effective treatment and support throughout their stay in custody. 

HMP Drake Hall 26
1.73 Clinical and psychosocial drug service delivery was of a very high quality with excellent levels
of integration, prisoner satisfaction and specialist care for drug users with mental health
problems.

1.74 Drug and alcohol recovery services (DARS) were provided by the charity Lifeline and Delphi
Medical, which provided substance misuse treatment. Twenty-seven prisoners were receiving
opiate substitution treatment (OST). The quality of the service was very good and prisoners
received clinical reviews approximately every two weeks.

1.75 Fifty-five per cent of prisoners receiving OST were on maintenance doses. This was
appropriate given the high level of mental health problems among the population.

1.76 Clinical and psychosocial services were integrated well, with shared care plans and joint
reviews; some group work was also co-facilitated. There were plans to co-locate the two
halves of the service, currently based separately, which would improve levels of integration,
and ultimately prisoner outcomes.

1.77 All prisoners on opiate substitution were very satisfied with the quality of the care provided by
the DARS team. They were especially encouraged following client forum sessions, where their
feedback had been translated into tangible service improvements, including the movement of
the medication administration time from the afternoon to first thing in the morning.

1.78 The quality of psychosocial work delivered by Lifeline was excellent. It included a wide range
of structured one-to-one and group work interventions, including information and recovery centred
approaches to both drugs and alcohol. However, there were no self-help fellowships, such as Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous, although there had been in the past. The service had ended for reasons outside the control of the prison or the substance misuse services.

1.79 A drug strategy meeting was held monthly; it was well attended and staff from across the prison were represented. The substance use needs analysis dated October 2011 was out of date and the drug strategy document dated March 2012 was being updated.